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Evil Empire
post Mar 27 2007, 01:29 PM
Post #16


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South Central Farmers Health and Education

1702 E. 41st St. Los Angeles, CA 90058

[email="%3Cscript%20language="] southcentralfarmers@hotmail.com [/email]

[/color]

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

March 27, 2007

Photos and interviews available upon request


[color="#000000"]South Central Farmers Tianguis

CELEBRATING EARTH DAY

WHAT: 1) Bringing Food to the ‘Hood

2) Featured Workshop by Melissa: Using worms in your garden (3pm)

3) Music and Entertainment

WHEN: Date -- Sunday, April 1, 2007

Time -- 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

WHERE: On 41st Street (between Long Beach and Alameda)

The SCFHEF Community Center & Gallery

1702 E. 41st Street

Los Angeles, CA 90058

(Metro: Exit Blue Line Vernon Station and walk four blocks North)

WHY: SCFHEF celebrates the depth and power of our earth and her resources to give and to teach. In a community and city surrounded by concrete and pollution the SCFHEF seeks to continue their work of connecting the care and stewardship of the earth with the struggle for justice and equality to all.

WHO: The eclectic line-up of artists, speakers, and musicians will feature:

 Music by --

~ Son Jarocho
~ Mezklah,
~ Aztlan Unearthed ,
~ Farm Life,
~ EarthStonez (tentative)

 Traditional Danza Azteca-Chichimeca & Music

 Children’s Workshops and Stories

 Holistic Care & Products

 South Central Farmers Cooking Demo

 And More!

As part of their commitment to keep Bringing Food to the ‘Hood, the SCFHEF hosts a monthly Tianguis marketplace in collaboration with various community-based organizations, artisans, and local merchants. Every first Sunday of the month, the Tianguis transforms public space surrounding the original 14-acre farm into a site for healthy eating, healthy economics, and healthy relationships.



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Evil Empire
post Apr 2 2007, 11:03 AM
Post #17


The Witch
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<H2 style="MARGIN: 20px 0px 0px">Urban Farming: Coming to a City Near You</H2><H5 style="MARGIN: 0px 0px 20px">By Jason Mark, E Magazine
Posted on March 26, 2007, Printed on March 30, 2007
http://www.alternet.org/story/49000/</H5>It's a chilly December day in Oakland, California -- overcast and gray -- and most folks are staying indoors. But outside a modest bungalow on the city's impoverished West Side, three young women volunteers are busy building a backyard garden for a local resident. They dump loads of dark, rich soil into a three-foot by eight-foot planter bed. Fruit and vegetable shoots sitting on the ground offer a glimpse of harvests to come -- strawberries and chard, lettuce, herbs and shelling peas.

The backyard garden construction is a project of City Slicker Farms, a local nonprofit that provides fresh food to a neighborhood better known for its railyards and warehouses than for its green spaces. In just seven years, City Slicker has become a vital part of the West Oakland landscape. Its six market gardens grow a range of organic fruit and vegetables, eggs and honey for sale at a neighborhood produce stand. Judging by the reception from neighborhood residents, the program is a success. "I buy all my vegetables here, and so does my wife," says Tony Lejones, a local truck driver, as he perused the offerings at the City Slicker stand. "The whole neighborhood comes here -- black, white and brown," he says. "They do a fine job."

City Slicker Farms is not alone. Across the U.S., an urban agriculture movement is flowering. In Birmingham, Alabama, Jones Valley Urban Farm is reclaiming abandoned lots and using them to grow organic produce and flowers. Chicago's Ken Dunn takes over unused parking lots and uses the sites to grow heirloom tomatoes. In St. Louis, a housing developer, Whittaker Homes, is setting up an organic farm within a new subdivision.

Veteran environmental activists and community organizers say the recent increase in urban food production marks a real change. "Whether it's the Food Project or Redhook Farm or countless other projects, urban agriculture is definitely increasing," says Betsy Johnson, executive director of the American Community Gardeners Assocation (ACGA). "I think the trend is very positive." There are several concerns propelling the renaissance in city agriculture: the country's obesity epidemic, the drive for more sustainable economies and the fact that horticulture -- with its regular, seasonal rewards -- is an ideal vehicle for community organizing, especially when it comes to youth.

"The drivers come from the public health community and the urban planning community that wants to green cities," says Tom Forster, policy director of the Community Food Security Coalition. "And I think the other big driver is homeland security, which now embraces food production at the local level."

Such worries are motivating more urban food production in Houston, according to Bob Randall, who directs an organization there called Urban Harvest. The group sponsors a series of vegetable growing classes, as well as a permaculture design course. Urban Harvest also launched Houston's first farmers' market, and organizes a yearly fruit tree sale that brings in nearly $50,000 in revenue over a weekend. Randall says increased interest in their programs is in part due to the promise of fossil-free local food production.

"With Houston being the oil capital, people here are more aware than most that oil prices are going to rise faster than inflation," Randall says. "As the cheap fuels dry up, metro areas are at huge risk."

The obesity epidemic, too, has hit low-income communities hardest, since the foods that have the most starch and fat are also the cheapest. Many urban food projects are driven by a desire to provide poor communities with healthier options. That's the idea behind Mill Creek Farm in Philadelphia. Started two years ago by a pair of twenty-something nutrition educators-turned farmers, Mill Creek has turned a vacant lot into a 1.5-acre garden full of carrots, squash, tomatoes and okra. At the height of summer, the farm's produce stand regularly sells out of goods.

"People don't have the option to get fresh, affordable, good quality, organic food in their neighborhood," says Johanna Rosen, one of the farm's co-founders. Community involvement and the promise of economic benefit are vital for urban agriculture projects to succeed. That's what Redhook Farm in Brooklyn is all about. A three-acre farm built on an abandoned baseball field, Redhook Farm uses organic farming and marketing as a way to grow economic opportunities for disadvantaged youth. "We want to have a 21st century park that is training teens for 21st century citizenship," says Ian Marvey, a co-founder of Redhook Farm. "That means hands-on training to build a sustainable economy, whether learning how to grow food [or] how to build a greenhouse."

At the core of urban farming is the desire to put the culture back into agriculture. It's an effort that seeks to place communities at the center of our food system. Back at the City Slicker garden, a cold rain has started to fall, but Liz Monk and the other volunteers keep working. As she shovels compost out of an old pickup truck, Monk tells a visitor that she spent a summer working on a country farm, but says that urban farming is more rewarding. "Just having face-to-face contact -- that's something that's very positive," says Monk. "It's the kind of thing that feeds your soul."

Editors: If you are interested in reprinting this article, please contact Featurewell at: featurewell@gmail.com /212-924-2283.

Jason Mark is the co-author, with Kevin Danaher, of "Insurrection: Citizen Challenges to Corporate Power."

<H5 style="MARGIN: 30px 0px 20px">© 2007 Independent Media Institute. All rights reserved.
View this story online at: http://www.alternet.org/story/49000/</H5>

I really like this idea. Although It wouldnt happen here where I live in Pennsylvania. But I love to work in a green house.

This post has been edited by Evil Empire: Apr 5 2007, 06:57 AM


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Evil Empire
post Apr 5 2007, 06:55 AM
Post #18


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Tribute Video in Number 1 Postion on Current TV help push itover the edge.... Written by Administrator Tuesday, 03 April 2007 Hi- I thought you might want to see this SCF short, currently ranked #1 on current TV's web-site. If it's still #1 on Thursday it will go on air (Al Gore's cable station, channel 142 in LA) and be seen by 100,000+ young people. [/size][/size]please click the link below to view. michael [size="2"]http://current.tv/watch/15493231.htm ________________________

Thanks!



The times I help you guys be security for the SCF was a major inspiration in my life. I now go to Santa Monica College and along with a large number of students we are about to have a farm on campus. The proposal [was] submitted to the administration, they have not shown any resistance and actually are looking forward to it.





Keep up the good work



-Luis


This post has been edited by Evil Empire: Apr 5 2007, 07:01 AM


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Evil Empire
post Apr 6 2007, 06:41 AM
Post #19


The Witch
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Check out this link for the pics that go with this article.

http://www.southcentralfarmers.com/index.p...174c7a843ad2f5c


Earth Day South Central Farmers' Tianguis Recap – April 1st, 2007 Written by Administrator Wednesday, 04 April 2007 Earth Day South Central Farmers' Tianguis Recap – April 1st, 2007





Song birds heralded Spring's arrival again as we set up for our April Earth Day Tianguis. The leveled Farm was showing signs of a green resurgence in the absence of the bulldozers, sprouts of plants defying the developers' plans.

The South Central Farmers Health and Education Fund welcomed El Dia de la Madre Tierra with ritual, celebration, performance, lessons and life-sustaining food.

Alma Soto passed out special green ribbons printed with the day's theme in gold for attendees to pin on and keep. Danza Azteca


The Danza Azteca Cuauhtemoc South Central Farm danced and prayed and blessed everyone with leader Refugio Cevallos exhorting us to speak out our truths.

Healthy Cooking Demonstration




Eugenia Mendez, Bernardo Soto and Lisa Duncan prepared a tempting potato and pea sauté dish for the healthy cooking demonstration. Here's the savory recipe:

Ingredients: Small red potatoes - sliced round and then in half Fresh snap peas Red and green bell peppers, sliced Onions - sliced round and then in half Garlic Olive oil Water Sea salt, coriander, tumeric

Split a large garlic clove in two and sauté in enough olive oil to cover the bottom of the pan. (This is to flavor the olive oil before beginning the sauté.) Add the sliced potatoes and brown on each side. Continue cooking the potatoes until they begin to soften.

Season with sea salt, coriander and tumeric. Add the sliced bell peppers. Continue cooking the mixture until the bell peppers start to soften. Keep tossing all the vegetables as they cook. Add onions. Keep tossing vegetables to integrate the flavors. Add more seasoning as needed. When onions are limp, add the shelled peas. Toss vegetables and add a small amount of water (about 1/4 cup). Cover to allow peas to cook in the steam. When peas are soft dish should be ready.

Add more oil as needed.

This vegan recipe is adaptable for any vegetable.

As you can imagine, the tasty samples went fast!


Worm Workshop

A highlight of the day was the Worm Workshop, conducted by Melissa Gutierrez and Jesus Soto.

[/color]

[color="#000000"]Uncovering a stack of slotted plastic bins on top of a collecting tray, they led us on a hidden journey into the secret lives of earthworms!


One starts by combining "green waste" (vegetable food - not too much citrus- and lawn clippings), and "brown waste" (recycled shredded paper and junk mail - not the glossy type) in equal proportions in the bin along with the hungry Red Wiggler worms. Spray a little water on it all to keep things moist. The little critters don't like temperature extremes or a lot of light, so a great place for the bins is under the sink or on a covered patio.





Let the worms go to work and after a few days, another bin can be added to the stack with the same composition. After some time and about four or five bins, the bottom bin reveals the decomposition that has taken place. What is left are the worm "castings"


which make great fertilizer when applied to the soil which in turn is watered in order to dilute the powerful substance. The bottom tray will have collected a brown liquid, called "worm tea" which, when diluted, makes a great natural herbicide and pesticide.

The worm bins become mini ecosystems and will attract other creatures, like spiders. It's sustainable in every way! I noticed the bins had no offensive odor, either.

For more information: caracolmarketplace@yahoo.com or www.myspace.com/caracolmarketplace

Music


Musical performers for the day included the reggae sounds of Mezklah; Aztlan Unearthed (indigenous music and bilingual poetry); traditional Mexican music: Son Jarocho (Veracruz), Rancheras, and Corridos; Myrin Wavoka Dewey, a Paiute/Shoshone flute player; Farm Life, the Farm's own hip hop group; and EarthStonez, an all woman hip hop/reggae group.




(Historical note:

Wovoka was the Paiute prophet who started the Ghost Dance religion. It was the unfounded fear of that religion that caused the cavalry to massacre the Minneconjou Lakota at Wounded Knee in 1890.)

Our dedicated vendors proffered raisins, almonds, pink and white grapefruit, oranges, Meyer lemons, Bloomsdale spinach, Detroit Red beets, carrots, radishes, Fava beans, and scallions, all fresh and delicious and healthy. Adjacent to the vegetables Rufina Juarez, elected leader of the South Central Farmers, set up a comparative display asking the provocative question, "How much sugar do you eat?"

Seamstress and jeweler Diana Tellez displayed outstanding, colorful, traditionally-inspired clothing and unique handcrafted earrings and necklaces. [email="myspace/%3Cscript%20language=%27JavaScript%27%20type=%27text/javascript%27%3E%20%3C%21--%20var%20prefix%20=%20%27ma%27%20+%20%27il%27%20+%20%27to%27;%20var%20path%20=%20%27hr%27%20+%20%27ef%27%20+%20%27=%27;%20var%20addy82371%20=%20%27hetellez%27%20+%20%27@%27%20+%20%27yahoo%27%20+%20%27.%27%20+%20%27com%27;%20document.write%28%20%27%3Ca%20%27%20+%20path%20+%20%27%5C%27%27%20+%20prefix%20+%20%27:%27%20+%20addy82371%20+%20%27%5C%27%3E%27%20%29;%20document.write%28%20addy82371%20%29;%20document.write%28%20%27%3C%5C/a%3E%27%20%29;%20//--%3E%20%3C/script%3E%20%3Cnoscript%3E%20This%20email%20address%20is%20being%20protected%20from%20spam%20bots,%20you%20need%20Javascript%20enabled%20to%20view%20it%3C/noscript%3E"]myspace/ [/email]hetellez@yahoo.com

Delicious quesadillas, soy ceviche, roasted corn and other prepared food and beverages were sold by the hardworking cooks who always seem to attract the most people!

Information tables provided attendees with literature and involovement opportunities from the following: the South Central Farm Health and Education Fund, CopWatch, the Green Party and the Eastside Cafe/La Otra Campana. The latter promoted awareness about the Cucapa issue in Baja California where an indigenous community is facing extreme oppression and cultural genocide due to privatization of fishing areas. "The Cucapa Encampment embodies all the typical genocidal policies of neoliberalism capitalism. Stripped of their natural resources of food because of dams, the Cucapa today depend on selling their labor at super exploitive rates and fishing in the mouth of the Colorado River Delta which is now being prohibited."

www.otra-losangeles.com

"The South Central Farmers Health and Education Fund celebrates the depth and power of our earth and her resources to give and to teach. In a community and city surrounded by concrete and pollution the SCFHEF seeks to continue their work of connecting the care and stewardship of the earth with the struggle for justice and equality for all."

-Linda Piera-Avila Last Updated ( Wednesday, 04 April 2007 ) Next >

This post has been edited by Evil Empire: Apr 6 2007, 06:43 AM


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Evil Empire
post Apr 13 2007, 09:47 AM
Post #20


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http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-to...ines-california
State has most minorities near toxic facilities
L.A. tops the nation's major urban areas with 1.1million Latinos, blacks and Asians living within two miles of hazardous waste sites.
By Janet Wilson
Times Staff Writer

April 12, 2007

California has the nation's highest concentration of minorities living near hazardous waste facilities, according to a newly released study. Greater Los Angeles tops the nation with 1.2 million people living less than two miles from 17 such facilities, and 91% of them, or 1.1 million, are minorities. Statewide the figure was 81%.

The study, conducted by researchers at four universities for the United Church of Christ, examined census data for neighborhoods adjacent to 413 facilities nationwide that process or store hazardous chemical waste produced by refineries, metal plating shops, drycleaners and battery recyclers, among others.

Though about one-third of U.S. residents are nonwhite, more than half of the people living near such facilities were Latino, African American or Asian American, according to the report.

The cause is simple, said Robert Bullard, a sociologist at Clark Atlanta University in Georgia and lead author of the study, which updates a landmark report from two decades ago. "The most potent predictor of where these facilities are sited is not how much income you have; it's race. You don't have many of these facilities in West Los Angeles, and you don't have many minorities in West Los Angeles either. You've got both in Vernon and surrounding neighborhoods."

L.A. ranked first among major urban areas with the most people living near hazardous waste facilities. Oakland and Orange County placed fifth and sixth, respectively, with hazardous sites in Santa Ana and other minority neighborhoods.

The study also found that hazardous waste facilities were often clustered with other potentially dangerous industries, and that the rate of minority residents in areas with multiple hazards was even higher.

"There's a piling on effect. You get the landfill because you've already got the incinerator, the paint manufacturer, the chemical plant," Bullard said. "These neighborhoods become basically sacrifice zones."

Sue Briggum, vice president of federal public affairs for Waste Management, which operates several of the facilities examined in the study, including a landfill in Kettleman City, Calif., said the hazardous waste industry is heavily regulated for safety and provides an important recycling service.

Briggum, who served on a national environmental justice task force several years ago, acknowledged the problems highlighted by the study. "There's no disputing the facts," she said. But, she added, the industry and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have done a great deal in recent years to try to reduce emissions, beef up safety and address other concerns in affected neighborhoods.

Although low-income neighborhoods were much more likely to have hazardous waste facilities, some of the areas examined were quite affluent, including one in Seattle that is predominantly Asian, said study coauthor Robin Saha, a sociologist with the University of Montana.

Bullard said the saddest case researchers studied was in rural Dickson County, Tenn., an almost entirely white area in which every industrial waste facility in the 300,000-acre county was built next to a 150-acre farm owned by a black family.

The study took EPA officials to task for failing to implement an executive order by President Clinton requiring that environmental justice issues and the cumulative effects of clustering such facilities in some neighborhoods be a mandatory part of environmental reviews.

Rep. Hilda Solis (D-El Monte) introduced legislation in February designed to achieve the same goals.

"This legislation is a critical first step to achieving real and lasting justice for minority and low-income communities across this country." Solis said. "Codifying the executive order will empower communities without a voice to join in the fight to protect their health and welfare."

EPA spokeswoman Jennifer Wood said the agency recognizes "that minority and/or low-income communities frequently may be disproportionately and adversely exposed to environmental harms and risks," and that the EPA attempts to address environmental justice concerns in its planning and budgeting.

But Bullard said the EPA's inspector general and the U.S. General Accountability Office have chastised the agency for its handling of environmental justice issues. President Bush's 2008 budget recommends a 28% cut in funds for such programs, he said

The report follows up on issues originally raised in the 1987 study "Toxic Wastes and Race in the United States," which is widely considered to have given birth to the environmental justice movement by linking race and income to elevated levels of environmental and industrial risk.

"We think that we've gotten so far in civil rights and creating a more equal society," coauthor Saha said of the new findings. "But when it comes to the environment, to the most basic things air and water we have a long way to go still."

janet.wilson@latimes.com

*

(INFOBOX BELOW)

Neighborhoods near hazardous waste sites

A new report lists 10 California metropolitan areas where residents living less than two miles from hazardous waste facilities were disproportionately minorities.

Percent people of color* living in neighborhoods that are:

Metropolitan area Near waste

(no. of facilities) facilities Not near Difference
L.A./Long Beach (17) 90.9% 65.8% 25.0%
Fresno (2) 78.4 58.9 19.6
San Jose (2) 77.1 53.6 23.5
Oakland (6) 76.0 49.2 26.7
Riverside/San Bernardino (4) 70.5 52.4 18.2
Orange County (3) 69.8 46.8 23.0
Vallejo/Fairfield/Napa (2) 59.1 45.4 13.7
Stockton/Lodi (1) 58.3 52.4 6.0
San Francisco (2) 55.6 48.6 7.0
Sacramento (1) 41.9 35.7 6.1


* Includes Latinos, African Americans, Asians, Pacific Islanders, Native Americans and other minorites.

Sources: United Church of Christ Justice and Witness Ministries, 2000 census

Next >



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Evil Empire
post Apr 19 2007, 04:48 PM
Post #21


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ACTION ALERT ON GENETIC ENGINEERING
- SUPPORT AB 541


-SUPPORT AB 541, THE FOOD AND FARM PROTECTION ACT
SEND A LETTER TO THE ASSEMBLY AGRICULTURE COMMITTEE BY APRIL 9TH


Assemblymember Jared Huffman (6th AD) has introduced AB 541. The bill would establish California's only state laws related to genetic engineering (GE) in agriculture and protect California farmers, consumers, and the food supply. AB 541 already has the support of many agricultural, environmental, health, faith and business organizations.Please register your support for this bill by mailing or faxing a letter to the Assembly Agriculture Committee. A sample letter is provided below.



AB 541 – The Food and Farm Protection ActAssemblymember Jared HuffmanIN BRIEFAB 541 establishes California’s only state laws related to genetic engineering (GE) in agriculture. It protects California farmers and the food supply in four ways: (1) Establishes the right of farmers and landowners to compensation for economic losses due to genetic contamination of their crops; (2) Protects farmers from liability if they unknowingly grow contaminated crops; (3) Establishes a GE crop notification process so that farmers can trace contamination to the GE manufacturer; (4) Protects the food supply by prohibiting the open-field cultivation of drug producing food crops.

THE ISSUES

For Farmers & Landowners — GE and non-GE plants can cross-pollinate and crops can be mixed together during harvest, handling and processing. Unlike the mixing of conventional crops, this is potentially disastrous because many consumers around the world refuse to eat GE-contaminated foods, and many of California’s buyers reject it. U.S. export markets have already closed as a result of contamination in soy, corn, and rice. Farmers and landowners who suffer economic losses due to GE contamination have no established legal recourse, but can be sued by the GE manufacturer for unknowingly growing contaminated crops. The locations of GE crop production are unknown — including the thousands of experimental field trials in California — so farmers and landowners cannot trace GE contamination to the responsible manufacturer.

For Our Food Supply — Experimental GE crops that produce drugs such as vaccines, hormones, and antibodies are currently grown in open-air trials in undisclosed locations in California. “Biopharming,” as it is known, puts the food supply at great risk of contamination by drugs not intended and not safe for general consumption.

EXISTING LAW

The State of California has no state laws or regulations governing GE crop production, and state and county agencies do not even know the locations of experimental field trials. In 2000, the legislature created a California Biotechnology Task Force. It disbanded without making any recommendations for state oversight. Four California counties have enacted local restrictions on GE crops, and a state pre-emption bill (SB 1056) to override these local laws failed in 2006.In spite of their pervasiveness in food and agriculture, the federal government has no mandatory human or environmental safety testing requirements for GE crops or food.

THE SOLUTION

AB 541 protects farmers and food in these ways: Establishes that GE crops that contaminate a farmer’s crop and cause economic harm constitute a nuisance. This gives farmers the legal recourse they need to recover damages.Protects farmers whose crops are unknowingly contaminated by patented GE crops from being sued for their use.Sets up a GE crop notification system so that farmers can find out the GE manufacturer should they be contaminated.Requires the inclusion of GE crop statistics in annual county and state crop reports.Protects the food supply and public health by eliminating the possibility for accidental exposure to drugs in food crops.

SUPPORTCalifornia Certified Organic Farmers • California Council of Churches IMPACT • Center for Food Safety • Center for Environmental Health • CleanWater Action • Community Alliance with Family Farmers • Consumer Action • Earthbound Farm • Earthjustice • Environment California • Occidental Arts and Ecology Center • Pesticide Action Network North America • Prevention Institute • South Central Farmers Cooperative • United Natural Foods Inc. — and many others

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Rebecca Darling: rebecca.darling@asm.ca.gov(916) 319-2006

Pete Price: pete@pricecon.com • (916) 448-1015



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Evil Empire
post Apr 23 2007, 07:18 AM
Post #22


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http://www.southcentralfarmers.com/index.p...af557b084f5f45f


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Evil Empire
post May 4 2007, 05:22 PM
Post #23


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[/font]South Central Frmers’ Tianguis

CELEBRATING INTERNATIONAL WORKERS MONTH

WHAT: 1) Bring Food to the Hood- Organic produce
2) Workshops and Food Demonstrations
3) Music and Entertainment

WHEN: Date -- Sunday, May 6, 2007 Time -- 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

[/color]WHERE: On 41st Street (between Long Beach and Alameda) The SCFHEF Community Center & Gallery1702 E. 41st Street Los Angeles, CA 90058(Metro: Exit Blue Line Vernon Station and walk four blocks North)

WHY: SCFHEF celebrates tenacity and struggle of workers to bring just working conditions and meaningful social change around the world

[font="Times New Roman"]WHO:
The eclectic line-up of artists, speakers, and musicians will feature: § Music by

--DJ Milo

Collectivo Error

Son Jarocho

Songó Electrico

§ Traditional Danza Azteca-Chichimeca & Music

§ Children’s Workshops and Stories

§ Holistic Care & Products

§ South Central Farmers Cooking Demo

[color="#000000"]§ And More!


As part of their commitment to keep Bringing Food to the ‘Hood, the SCFHEF hosts a monthly Tianguis marketplace in collaboration with various community-based organizations, artisans, and local merchants. Every first Sunday of the month, the Tianguis transforms public space surrounding the original 14-acre farm into a site for healthy eating, healthy economics, and healthy relationships. #### end



Last Updated ( Thursday, 03 May 2007 )


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Evil Empire
post Jun 1 2007, 11:52 AM
Post #24


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South Central Farmers Health and Education
1702 E. 41st St. Los Angeles, CA 90058
[email="%3Cscript%20language="] southcentralfarmers@hotmail.com [/email][/font]

Photos and interviews available upon request

South Central Farmers Tianguis

Displaced, but not Defeated!

**Reflections One Year Later**

WHAT: 1) Bring Food to the Hood- Organic produce

2) Workshops and Food Demonstrations

3) Music and Entertainment: Pachamama, Farm Life and More

WHEN: Date -- Sunday, June 3, 2007
Time -- 12:00 pm to 6:00 pm***Music – 2pm to 6pm***

WHERE: On 41st Street (between Long Beach and Alameda)
The SCFHEF Community Center & Gallery1702 E. 41st Street Los Angeles, CA 90058(Metro: Exit Blue Line Vernon Station and walk four blocks North)

WHY: Reflecting upon the past, present, and future of the South Central Farmers. A year after the final eviction, our neighborhoods still lack access to healthy produce and quality green space. While unable to farm the 14 acres at Alameda and 41st street, the fight for food sovereignty, land access, and a better quality of life continues for the South Central Farmers. Displaced, but not defeated, the farmers continue their work to bring change to their communities.

[font="Times New Roman"]WHO:
The eclectic line-up of artists, speakers, and musicians will feature:

§ Music by – Farm Life Pachamama And More!

§ Traditional Danza Azteca-Chichimeca & Music

§ Children’s Workshops and Stories

§ Holistic Care & Products

§ South Central Farmers Cooking Demo

§ And More!

As part of their commitment to keep Bringing Food to the ‘Hood, the SCFHEF hosts a monthly Tianguis marketplace in collaboration with various community-based organizations, artisans, and local merchants.

Every first Sunday of the month, the Tianguis transforms public space surrounding the original 14-acre farm into a site for healthy eating, healthy economics, and healthy relationships.

Last Updated ( Thursday, 31 May 2007 )


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I TALK WHAT I FUCKING WANT TO SAY!

http://guerrillaradio.net./








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Evil Empire
post Jun 6 2007, 07:42 PM
Post #25


The Witch
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Posts: 1,724
Joined: 28-February 06
From: PENNSYLVANIA
Member No.: 3,907



South Central Farmers.com



!!SAVE THE DATE!!

June 13th
The South Central Farm:
Retrospection, Reflection and Reconnection



When:
Wednesday, June 13th

Time:

Beginning @ 6:30pm

Where:

Corner of MLK Blvd and Alameda Blvd, 90058



Encampment Re-Union, Vigil, Potluck, Slide Show, and More

One year after the eviction, let's come together to connect, to remember, and to look towards the future.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FEgvoaO4K5w




Questions: call Sarah at 626-484-5223



Please Distribute Widely
Thank You!


--------------------
I TALK WHAT I FUCKING WANT TO SAY!

http://guerrillaradio.net./








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Evil Empire
post Jun 8 2007, 01:31 PM
Post #26


The Witch
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Group: Activist
Posts: 1,724
Joined: 28-February 06
From: PENNSYLVANIA
Member No.: 3,907



The South Central Farmers' Report from the United Nations Visit on May, 2007.

By Rufina Juarez



This experience has widened our understanding of peoples' struggle for access to space and land. This UN session concentrated on the displacement of people all over the world but with a focus on land, territory and natural resources of indigenous people. How we as indigenous people struggle for our culture, language ancestral rights, access to our natural resources and the right educate, designate and retain our own names for communities, places and persons, Our children have the right to all levels and forms of education, all indigenous people have the right to provide education in their own language in a manner appropriate to their culture methods of teaching and learning...this is what the model that we had in LA represented in a vary small scale with the poorest areas in Los Angeles, CA. We learned of the results and effects suffered from people who are displaced from their place of origin, be it the first generation, second and the destruction of their families when you are forced to move.



As representatives of our community, we spoke with conviction about the violent destruction of this model and how it affected these families. We spoke of our "goal" to have basic human rights to "good quality food" and that as a community we have that right by our inheritance as indigenous people. The definition of "human rights" was developed during a time in history when repression of indigenous people was in vogue. "We" as people need to redefine what our "human rights" are. This self determination forces people to change old definitions that do not fit with or relationship to the land and our ways of planting our food.



The UN experience has marked and elevated the struggle of the SCF to an international level. We have denounced, for the record at the UN, the inhumane treatment of the SCFs by the City of Los Angeles. It was 10 days of hard work and learning how nations report on their different plans on how to save the resource of the world. Now the nations are looking at traditional people to bring back a balance with all the ‘global warming' that is happening. We participated in the Sixth Session on the Indigenous People Forum with the help of La Red Indigena Xicana. Our intervention was presented on May 18, 2007 in front of the Special Rapporturr on Human Rights violations. Along with other peoples of the world, we waited for our own turn and spoke on displaced people in poor urban settings. ON Monday, 21 we sat on a panel as a speaker on Migration issues in an urban setting. We talked about the need to access land in order to move from a dependent community to an independent community that can feed their families and surrounding communities in order to deal with diseases in our community; obesity and diabetes. If we cannot change this cycle we will only be part of the market that is full of dependent poor communities on medication since they do not have the right to good quality foods! Yes, we will perish as a community due to the diseases that have taken over and our lack to change our behaviors.




United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, 6th Session

Statement by

South Central Farmers and La Red Xicana Indigena

May 18, 2007





Madam Chair, Indigenous sisters and brothers of the world:



My name is Rufina Juarez, President of the South Central Farmers of Los Angeles and representative of La Red Xicana Indigena. I would like to submit the following statement.

The corporate production of food, such as hybrid corn, soy, and wheat, has taken over the production of local high quality ancestral food (i.e., corn, squash, and beans) through the displacement of traditional agricultural communities who produce food for their own use and for trade. Corporate take over of agricultural lands forces families to flee to local and international urban areas, where they transform from a self-reliant, highly skilled agricultural society, into poor and politically vulnerable substrata of urban society. Economically dependent on low wages for unskilled labor, men, women and children loose their relationships, roles, ancestral knowledge and practices of self sufficiency. Their lack of economic resources makes them dependent on cheap poor-quality food produced by the corporations, which displaced them in the first place. Coupled with the lack of health education and basic health care they are highly defenseless to long term diseases like obesity, diabetes, cancer, and asthma, which make them life time consumers of pharmaceuticals. The rise of childhood illnesses produces long term profit for corporations. Indigenous peoples in diaspora are in fact paying for their own oppression.



For 14 years since 1992, the South Central Farm was the largest and most biologically-diverse urban farm in the US. The farm was organized within a traditional collective structure. A variety of indigenous plants, medicine and seeds from throughout the hemisphere were cultivated and preserved on this farm. Nahuas, Seri, and Zapotecos were among the farmers who brought their traditional plants, seeds and agricultural technology from their homelands, reflecting the contemporary diaspora of Xicanas/os and newly displaced indigenous peoples from México, Central and South America in the US.

After three years of political and legal struggle to save the farm we were evicted due to not having any rights as migrant and displaced indigenous peoples in the US. I am here to put on the UN record, the excessive force and police brutality that occurred in June 13, 2006 when we were forcefully removed in the mist of litigation of the right to title. 350 indigenous farmers have been made dependent on the purchase and consumption of corporate foods. Consequently, we've been denied the right to grow our traditional foods and teach our children their relationship with the land. We are an example of a dispersed indigenous population that does not have any rights to practice the continuity of our ancestral traditions outside of their homeland. We are indigenous peoples in the US who need the international protections of the Declaration.



We were evicted and more than 500 trees and all our traditional medicinal plants were destroyed in the name of economic development. This is a story commonly known through out the world, especially when it comes to the exploitation of ancestral land, territories and natural resources. However, here we are referring to a fundamental human right to grow our own ancestral foods and medicine and to pass it on to the coming generations. The nation-states refer to this as "Food Security", however, if as indigenous peoples in diaspora we can obtain the protections and right to grow our traditional foods it would mean "food sovereignty".

For this reason we would like to make the following recommendations:
  • 1) We urge the UN member states to adopt the UN Declaration on the Right of Indigenous People as approved by the Council of Human Rights, without any addendums.
  • 2) We invite the Special Rapporteur on Migration and the Rapporteur on Indigenous Peoples and Human Rights to look into the abuse of indigenous peoples rights, especial that of children who are in diaspora in the United States and are suffering from the vulnerability of malnutrition and under nutrition, which in effect is affecting the alarming rate of chronic illnesses such as child/youth diabetes, asthma, cancer and lymphatic diseases.
  • 3) We endorse the Women's Caucus Statement on Human Rights, specifically the statement and recommendations relevant to Indigenous Women and Migration, which urges UN Member states to address the issue of large number of indigenous migrants within and beyond national borders and the particular vulnerability of indigenous women migrants.
  • 4) We endorse the Caucus of Abya Ayala Statement, specifically item #6 and 7, which recommend's that UN Agencies (such as UNESCO, FAO-Food and Agricultural Organization, CHR-Council on Human Rights, Special Rapporteur's) work to influence and/or develop appropriate mechanisms, instruments and indicators that would allow for the collection of disaggregated data that would identify the specific conditions of indigenous peoples in diaspora within the United States.


Contact information:



South Central Farmers

www.southcentralfarmers.com

SCF Hotline: 1-888-SCFARM-1

Rufina Juarez: juarezrufina@yahoo.com



La Red Xicana Indígena

www.laredxicanaindigena.com

Celia H. Rodríguez (California): celiahrodriguez@comcast.net

Rosalee Gonzalez (Arizona): xicanista1@aol.com

Last Updated ( Thursday, 07 June 2007 )


--------------------
I TALK WHAT I FUCKING WANT TO SAY!

http://guerrillaradio.net./








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Evil Empire
post Jun 9 2007, 06:59 PM
Post #27


The Witch
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Group: Activist
Posts: 1,724
Joined: 28-February 06
From: PENNSYLVANIA
Member No.: 3,907



South Central Farmers Health and Education

1702 E. 41st St. Los Angeles, CA 90058




For Immediate Release: June 8, 2007 Contact: Tezozomoc

818-892-5248


South Central Farmers' Encampment Re-Union

Displaced, but not defeated!

**Reflections One Year Later**


WHAT: 1) Vigil and Procession around land

2) Traditional Music and Danza Azteca

3) Potluck

4) Screening of the trailer for Tierra y Libertad: a film recording the last 4 years
of the South Central Farmers fight by Scott Hamilton




WHEN: Date -- Wednesday, June 13, 2007

Time - 6:30pm to 9:30 pm



WHERE: Located on the East corners of MLK Jr. Blvd and Alameda Blvd., LA 90058

(Metro: Exit Blue Line Vernon Station and walk five blocks North)



WHY: Reflecting upon the past, present, and future of the South Central Farmers. A year after the final eviction, our neighborhoods still lack access to healthy produce and quality green space. While unable to farm the 14 acres at Alameda and 41st street, the fight for food sovereignty, land access, and a better quality of life continues for the South Central Farmers. Displaced, but not defeated, the farmers continue their work to bring change to their communities.



As part of their commitment to keep Bringing Food to the ‘Hood, the SCFHEF hosts a monthly Tianguis marketplace in collaboration with various community-based organizations, artisans, and local merchants. Every first Sunday of the month, the Tianguis transforms public space surrounding the original 14-acre farm into a site for healthy eating, healthy economics, and healthy relationships.



--------------------
I TALK WHAT I FUCKING WANT TO SAY!

http://guerrillaradio.net./








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Evil Empire
post Jun 12 2007, 04:13 PM
Post #28


The Witch
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Joined: 28-February 06
From: PENNSYLVANIA
Member No.: 3,907



The South Central Farm @ City Council June 13 9:00am

The South Central Farmers Support Committee will be going to City Council tomorrow morning (June 13th) during public comments to let the council know that the South Central Farmers are still going strong without the help of the politicians.

We will be meeting at the Council chambers between 9 and 9:30am, Public Comments are at 10am.

Please come wearing green. Let the council know that this struggle of the farmers and for green space and food sovereignty is not going to die.

Please repost!


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I TALK WHAT I FUCKING WANT TO SAY!

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Evil Empire
post Jun 18 2007, 07:04 AM
Post #29


The Witch
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Group: Activist
Posts: 1,724
Joined: 28-February 06
From: PENNSYLVANIA
Member No.: 3,907



http://la.indymedia.org/news/2007/06/200812.php

Please click the link and see what has become of the farm since last summer when it was bulldozed. its very sad


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I TALK WHAT I FUCKING WANT TO SAY!

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Evil Empire
post Aug 3 2007, 10:14 AM
Post #30


The Witch
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Group: Activist
Posts: 1,724
Joined: 28-February 06
From: PENNSYLVANIA
Member No.: 3,907



South Central Farmers Health and Education

1702 E. 41st St. Los Angeles, CA 90058




South Central Farmers Tianguis

Celebrating the New Corn

**Reflections One Year Later**


WHAT: 1) Bringing Food to the Hood- Organic produce

2) Workshops and Food Demonstrations

3) Music and Entertainment



WHEN: Date -- Sunday, August 5, 2007

Time -- 10:00 am to 5:00 pm



WHERE: On 41st Street (between Long Beach and Alameda)

The SCFHEF Community Center & Gallery

1702 E. 41st Street

Los Angeles, CA 90058

(Metro: Exit Blue Line Vernon Station and walk four blocks North)



WHY: After a year of continuing the struggle, the South Central Farmers bring their first harvest of corn into the South Central community. While unable to farm the 14 acres at Alameda and 41st street, the fight for food sovereignty, land access, and a better quality of life continues for the South Central Farmers. Displaced, but not defeated, the farmers remain committed the work of bringing change to their communities.



WHO: § Traditional Danza Azteca-Chichimeca & Music

§ Children's Workshops and Stories

§ Holistic Care & Products

§ South Central Farmers Cooking Demo

§ And More!

As part of their commitment to keep Bringing Food to the ‘Hood, the SCFHEF hosts a monthly Tianguis marketplace in collaboration with various community-based organizations, artisans, and local merchants. Every first Sunday of the month, the Tianguis transforms public space surrounding the original 14-acre farm into a site for healthy eating, healthy economics, and healthy relationships.









--------------------
I TALK WHAT I FUCKING WANT TO SAY!

http://guerrillaradio.net./








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